Million Dollar District: How Landmark Designation Pays

Property rights enthusiasts often argue their opposition to preservation ordinances through the lens of “highest and best use.”  The concept of highest and best use provides that any given parcel of land should be used in a reasonable, legal, and financially feasible way to yield the highest value for that land.  Think of it this way: this principle is essentially why skyscrapers are a thing.  You can use the land over and over and over again, collecting rent each time.  And tell me, readers, what’s a better use than making cold, hard cash? For  economy of column space, we’ll keep zoning out of the discussion because that’s a big discussion.  Just know that you can only build skyscrapers where you are allowed to build skyscrapers. Enough on that for  now.

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A Diamond in the Roof: Common Roof Types.

As we’ve noted before, houses come in infinite styles, plans, and configurations.  It can be hard to keep track of the different types of housing stock out there.  The American domestic architectural gods have given us one reprieve, though: generally speaking, there are just a few major roof types found on a wide range of house styles across the country.  Lucky us.

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Hey, nice glass!

Earlier this week we looked at a commonly misused term in architectural parlance: “Victorian.”   I’d posit that “stained glass” is one that gets tossed around incorrectly just as often.  It is extremely unlikely that you have true stained glass in your home (unfortunately!).  Truth is, in the U.S., actual, honest-to-goodness stained glass is a rare bird, especially in an area like Chicago, which was largely developed in the mid-to-late nineteenth century.

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Preservation Standards: We All Have to Follow the Rules.

Perhaps the most common argument made by anti-preservationists has been that local historical commissions — the cityfolk who decide what’s a landmark and what you can do to your landmark — are inherently subjective in making their decisions.  It is very often assumed that a board of commissioners will deny a homeowner’s proposal for an addition on his or her historic house because it’s just not very pretty.  Sometimes, this has held up in court, and there’s a robust history of property owners attempting to sue the pants off their municipality for denying a building or demolition permit.

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Victorian: It’s an Era, Not a Style.

Let’s be honest: we all like historic architecture, but not all of us know quite how to talk about it.  Maybe you can wrap your head around Colonial vs. Victorian vs. Art Deco vs. Modern, but in a city like Chicago, we’re blessed with building stock that challenges those descriptors.  And getting the nomenclature right when there are dozens of architectural styles and infinite substyles can be frustrating, even when you’re at your most eloquent.

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Buying an Historic Home? What You Need to Know.

I Speak Vintage has heard quite a few horror stories from folks that have bought vintage or historic homes, only to be left holding the bag, as it were.  While historic homes have an appeal and charm for many buyers, there are certain restrictions and expenses (that’s an understatement)  you need to know about before signing on the dotted line.

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I Bought an Old House. H-E-L-P!

Happy New Year!brownstone

It’s been a busy season and DYSV is back on track. Holiday parties, family gatherings, long overdue get-togethers with friends, and office parties has spurred lots and lots of talk about all things old, vintage and historic – as far as homes and buildings go, anyway.     I have talked with so many friends, colleagues, and clients over the holidays about old houses, historic homes and vintage buildings and there has been an overwhelming similarity in experiences.   There are just too darn many buyers that did not know what kind of a jam they were getting themselves into – and that’s not right!  Let’s do a little something about that.

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